Deadlift

Exercise Overview

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Introduction

Some call the Deadlift the purest test of strength, and the king of all exercises. It hits more muscles, all in one movement, than almost any other exercise in existence. Deadlifts can be key for anything from building brute strength and size, to rehabilitating a chronically painful back.

The Deadlift is a simple lift requiring only that the lifter pick a barbell off the floor, but doing so properly is important to reap the benefits of this exercise. The Deadlift is used in Powerlifting, and Strongman competitions as a test of strength. In Powerlifting, the Deadlift is performed alongside the Squat and Bench Press.

How to Deadlift

Before approaching the barbell, be sure that you are pulling from the proper height. The size of a large diameter plate on each side should raise the bar to approximately 9 inches (22.5 cm).

In this guide we will focus on the most popular Deadlift style, referred to as conventional. Practice all steps on every set, even on warm ups.

The Setup:

Deadlift Starting Position

Start Position

  1. Stand over the barbell with your feet under the bar. The bar should start a few inches in front of the shins.
  2. Foot stance slightly inside shoulder width with toes forward or slightly pointed outward.
  3. Bend over and grip the bar (grip methods below) with arms hanging directly below shoulders.

The Repetition:

  1. Take a deep breath into the diaphragm (and hold).
  2. Bend at the knees and hips while pushing the butt backward. The barbell should now be right against the shins.
  3. Flatten out the back and create a neutral spine position with the head in a neutral position, and hold this position.
  4. Relax the arms.
  5. Pull aggressively, but smoothly, pulling the bar from the floor by driving with the legs. Keep the bar as close as possible to the shins and thighs throughout the movement.
  6. Once the bar reaches above the knees, force the hips forward into the bar. Stand tall and erect to reach the locked out position.
  7. Lower the bar by again bending at the knees and hips while holding the neutral spine.
  8. Release breath.

    eric-lilliebridge-deadlift

    End Position

Bar positioning, foot stance, and hand grip width all vary slightly between lifters. The proper positioning keeps the knees from collapsing inward (knee knocking), and allows the arms to hang as long as possible. If legs are too wide, and the hands gripped too narrow, the knees will interfere with the arms.

Neutral spine alignment sets the vertebrae into their strongest position. It is important to teach new lifters this position when performing movements that load the spine to reduce risk of injury. The deep breath helps pressurize and stabilize this position. Occasionally, very experienced lifters choose to use a slightly rounded back as an advanced technique.

Common Deadlift Form Problems

  • Too much back rounding: Focus on keeping the chest upright while sticking the butt out. Lower the weight if deadlift form becomes too rounded to the point of risking injury.
  • Feet too wide: As mentioned above, many beginners don’t allow enough room for the knees to travel without collapsing inward. A shoulder width and under stance is typically recommended.
  • Leaning far back at lockout: Standing up tall with the shoulders back, and knees locked is where the repetition ends. Leaning back too far can risk back injury.
  • Curling the barbell: Make sure arms are relaxed and hanging like chains. If you are having trouble, it is sometimes recommended to flex the triceps during Deadlifts to extend the arm.
  • Rounding to set the bar down: Some beginners will have perfect form right up until the descent. Make sure you keep the back neutral to reduce risk of injury.
  • Bouncing off the floor: Reset the bar on the floor each repetition, or touch the bar lightly on the floor.
  • Bar drifting away from body: The bar should be close, almost dragging the shins and thighs all the way up, and all the way back down. If the bar is too far from the body, optimal leverage is lost, putting the body into a weaker position. You may need to setup with the bar closer, sit back more, or squeeze the lats to keep the bar close.

Deadlift Grips

The commonly used Mixed Grip

The commonly used Mixed Grip

When using increasingly heavy weights, holding a grip on the barbell becomes difficult. When the barbell begins to roll out of the hands, it is time to use a stronger grip more suitable for heavy pulling. Defaulting to lifting straps is never recommended. The deadlift is a great grip strengthening exercise and a strong grip should not be neglected.

Once the weights get heavy, you will also need to use chalk. There are two grips used for deadlifting, the Mixed Grip, and Hook Grip.

Mixed Grip

This grip is the most common among deadlifters. With one hand, simply grip the bar underhand, with the other gripped overhand. This under/over grip keeps the bar from rolling out of the hands, and is a much more secure grip. When using this grip, be sure to never “curl” with the underhand which can lead to bicep injury.

Hook Grip

Hook Grip

Hook Grip

The hook grip is a slightly more advanced grip that can take practice. The hook grip allows for both hands to be overhand, but still retain a strong grip. Some lifters prefer it to the mixed grip due to its symmetry and eliminated risk of bicep injury. This grip depends on chalk even more so than the mixed grip.

With the hook grip, the barbell is gripped deeper in the hand, allowing the thumb to wrap around the barbell first, before the rest of the fingers. Once the thumb is wrapped around the barbell, the rest of the fingers are wrapped around the barbell and the thumbs. When used properly, the friction between the thumbs and other fingers gives the bar a very secure grip.

Hook gripping can be painful in the beginning, but with practice the pain decreases. Lifters with already heavy deadlifts have a harder time transitioning.

Variations of the Deadlift

Different deadlift variations can shift emphasis onto muscles differently. These variations can be used for variety sake, or to assist Deadlift progress. Unless otherwise mentioned, the same setup and form is used from the standard Deadlift.

Deficit Deadlift

Standing on plates, 4-inch Deficit

4-inch Deficit

A great exercise for off the floor strength as well as lockout. Standing on plates or blocks creates for a longer ROM (range of motion). This will require you to reach down further to grab the barbell. All different heights are used to stand on from normal (2 inches) to extreme (bar resting on shoe laces). Typically lifters like to bring the hips down lower, and use the legs to squat the barbell up more than on a standard deadlift.

Romanian Deadlift

This variation of the deadlift adds focus on the eccentric portion of the deadlift and shifts emphasis onto the lower back and hamstrings. This movement typically does not start from the floor, instead is walked out of a rack. With a tight lower back arch and only a slight knee bend, the bar is lowered under control while forcing the hips far back and letting the bar ride down the thighs. The weight is reversed and lifted back to lockout before the lower back loses its arch. For most people, the plates never touch the ground. An alternate (under/over) grip is typically not recommended with this variation. Lifters sometimes use this exercise to improve deadlift lock out strength.

Rack Deadlift / Block Deadlift (Partial Range of Motion)

Leeman's 2-inch Block Deadlift - 855 Lb

2-inch Block Deadlift

This style is used to reduce the range of motion by setting a barbell in a rack, resting higher than the normal starting height. Similarly, blocks are also used under the plates to raise the barbell off the floor.

Lifters use this variation to overload the body by handling heavier weights. Many use this variation to improve lockout strength on the deadlift. Recommended heights range anywhere below the knee, and most prefer to use Blocks.

Band / Chain Deadlift

Both of these methods add an increasing amount of resistance toward the lockout. By using this method, you are able to overload the top of the movement by using a heavier weight than the lifter could normally deadlift. At the same time, it decreases the amount of resistance at the bottom, making for a unique force curve. Bands and Chains both are typically used to help a lifter who is struggling with the lockout.

Some lifters say accommodating resistance like this also helps the lifter learn how to lift quickly and carry momentum into the lockout. When ascending slowly, the repetition may be difficult or impossible to lockout as the resistance builds and the lifter fatigues.

Snatch Grip Deadlift

The Snatch Grip Deadlift is a deadlift with a very wide grip. The grip width should be wide enough to bring the bar up to the hip crease at lockout, like the olympic lift, the Snatch. This variation keeps the upper back tight, and creates a longer range of motion. Typically this deadlift is performed with a tight arched back, a very high chest, lower hips, and gripped with straps or hook grip.

Trap Bar Deadlift

Trap bar deadlifts require a specialty bar called a trap bar. This not-so-popular variation uses more quadriceps and typically has good carryover to the squat. This variation also allows for some extra overloading.

Deadlift Tips & Mental Notes

Pete mentally preparing

Pete mentally preparing

  • Pull explosively! Don’t lose form and positioning, but practice being fast from the floor to lockout.
  • Get your mind right. Make sure you are ready, and don’t rush the setup. Rushing into a deadlift you’re not feeling ready for usually doesn’t make for the best performance.
  • Use chalk, and a strong grip. This one was already mentioned above, but it’s important. It is hard to progress and apply power with a loose, weak grip.
  • Film yourself. If you don’t have a seasoned coach watching your every rep, record yourself for instant feedback. Post it up so others can critique or share some tips.
  • Control the weight, don’t let it control you. When you setup to break the bar off the floor, your body shouldn’t move around before the bar leaves the ground. Your body and the barbell should lift together when force is applied.
  • Go barefoot or get a good pair of shoes. Soft and squishy running shoes are unstable and soak up the force you want to apply to the barbell. Shoes with thin soles are best.
  • Reset each rep. While not required, it’s a good habit to use when first learning the deadlift. You will pick up the form more quickly if you can re-gather yourself between each repetition.
  • Push the earth away from you. Mentally pushing the ground away instead of pulling the bar upward is a popular mental queue some lifters say helps technique.

Advanced Deadlifting Noteschris-deadlift-rounding

For those chasing every last pound or kilogram, there are some extra technique tweaks. Beginners are recommended to ignore this bit until proficient with the recommended technique.

  • Take the slack out of the bar. Building just enough tension to give the barbell some bend before breaking it off the floor can help positioning off the floor and reduce the range of motion.
  • Relaxing the upper back. Some Powerlifters use controlled rounding to their advantage. Hanging the shoulders and slightly relaxing the upper back can reduce ROM while allowing a higher starting position and more speed off the floor. The amount of rounding is locked in during the deadlift setup, and does not increase during the rep. It can be difficult to keep the lower back in a neutral position with this technique, use at your own discretion.

Deadlift Assistance Exercises

The deadlift variations mentioned above work well for improving the deadlift, but there are other exercises that work well in addition. Here’s some popular deadlift assistance exercises worth using:

  • Squats (all variations)
  • Good Mornings
  • Back Extensions
  • Cleans
  • Leg Press
  • Zercher Squats
  • Glute-Hamstring Raises
  • Reverse Hyper
  • Rows
  • Pull-ups
  • Shrugs
  • Weighted Abdominal Work

Deadlift Injury Risk and Prevention

The most common injury relating to deadlift is to the biceps. When lifters use the mixed grip, the under hand’s bicep can turn into a risk for bicep strain or tear. It is important for lifters using the mixed grip to always avoid pulling, or curling, with the bicep while deadlifting.

Back muscle pulls and strains are also common, especially for the beginner lifters who are increasing quickly in weights and may not have perfected their form. Typically they are never serious long-term injuries, but are uncomfortable and can take awhile to heal. Easing into heavier deadlifts and always maintaining recommended form as a beginner can help prevent strains.

Lifters unable to position themselves into proper form are strongly recommended to read about increasing mobility. Lack of the proper mobility can leave the lifter in vulnerable positions during any lift, increasing risk of injury.

Video Demonstration of Proper Deadlift Form

The video below goes over tightness, foot stance width, and more.

64 Comments

  1. Brian

    recently tried low-start deads to help aleviate lower back stress, only downside is its apparently gonna really slow down my conventional DL progression when I switch back. 

    Reply
  2. Ryan Gosling

    AWWW YEAH!!!
     
    I agree with Shadow, sumo is nowhere near as cool as conventional. Only problem with that is that I’m some 40 lb stronger pulling sumo. Plus my lower back rounds when I pull conventional.
     
    How can I become strong at conventional and forget that I ever pulled sumo? :D

    Reply
  3. Brian

    Already another discussion? Y’all are gonna run out of topics in 2 months lol.
     
    Anywho…
     
     
    Sumo deads are gay and I pull sumo. Conventional is so much cooler. 

     
     
    Why are sumos gay? I know you say that in jest, but are you saying this to describe it simply as inferior, or is it something else?
     
    Ive never really thought of any lift as gay, as I feel all have their purpose. So not sure why you would describe it that way.

    Reply
  4. Potato

    Why are sumos gay? I know you say that in jest, but are you saying this to describe it simply as inferior, or is it something else?
     
    Ive never really thought of any lift as gay, as I feel all have their purpose. So not sure why you would describe it that way.

    You know how you can just spot some gay dudes from a mile off for no real reason, it’s the same thing with a sumo, it’s just an unexplainable sight..

    Sumophobic?
     

    4) My grip sucks, SUCKS, SUCKS. (My excuse is that my fingers are too short or something. :D ) Be that as it may, how do you get your grip stronger?

     

    -Use DOH for aslong as you can during your warmups on deads
    -Do a highish rep DOH backoff set after your mainset of deads and try to hit a new DOH rep PR every week
    -Burn your straps (or in your case the tree roots out of the ground and the rope you use to asphyxiate your boyfriends with)
    -Ankle weights on your wrists when masturbating
    -Use a thumbless grip wherever possible
    -Hold lots of heavy things
    -Chalk

    Reply
  5. Brian

    Yeah, I think I know what ya mean, kinda like when my gaydar goes off from seeing some burly powerlifter spotting a dude from behind while hes squatting. Thats just max gay.

    Reply
  6. maraudermeat

    AWWW YEAH!!!
     
    I agree with Shadow, sumo is nowhere near as cool as conventional. Only problem with that is that I’m some 40 lb stronger pulling sumo. Plus my lower back rounds when I pull conventional.
     
    1) How can I become strong at conventional and forget that I ever pulled sumo? :D
     
    2) Is some amount of low back rounding OK?
     
    3) Also, everybody seems to have a sticking point at the knees or trouble locking out or some shit like that, but my conventional weak point is right off the floor. Used to be legit right at the floor, now it’s maybe 1 inch off the floor. What’s up with that?
     
    4) My grip sucks, SUCKS, SUCKS. (My excuse is that my fingers are too short or something. :D ) Be that as it may, how do you get your grip stronger?

    1.  get strong at both.  I routinely do both. 
    2.  rounding of the lower back WILL lead to injury over time.  if the lower back is rounding its because you are allowing the bar to get out in front of you.  the deadlift is a pull for a reason.  you are actively pulling the bar back while at the same time bringing the body to the bar.  the lower back rounds when one is just picking the weight UP off the floor. 
    3.If you are missing right off the floor you are undoubtably immidiately shifting the weight forward and your hips are flying up before you even get a chance to use the lower body to start the lift.  i bet if i saw a max attempt of yours it would show me basically a stiff legged dead with the weight way out in front of you. 
    4. grip should never be an issue. i’ve never undstood how someone’s grip could be the limiting factor on a deadlift.  but if it is, then you really need to make it a priority.  do ALL of your back and bicep work with a thumbless grip.  also, do a lot of pulls double overhand to really work that grip…also.. use plenty of chalk. 

    Reply
  7. maraudermeat

    Yeah, I think I know what ya mean, kinda like when my gaydar goes off from seeing some burly powerlifter spotting a dude from behind while hes squatting. Thats just max gay.

    i’m gay every squat day then. 

    Reply
  8. Ryan Gosling

    1.  get strong at both.  I routinely do both. 
    2.  rounding of the lower back WILL lead to injury over time.  if the lower back is rounding its because you are allowing the bar to get out in front of you.  the deadlift is a pull for a reason.  you are actively pulling the bar back while at the same time bringing the body to the bar.  the lower back rounds when one is just picking the weight UP off the floor. 
    3.If you are missing right off the floor you are undoubtably immidiately shifting the weight forward and your hips are flying up before you even get a chance to use the lower body to start the lift.  i bet if i saw a max attempt of yours it would show me basically a stiff legged dead with the weight way out in front of you. 
    4. grip should never be an issue. i’ve never undstood how someone’s grip could be the limiting factor on a deadlift.  but if it is, then you really need to make it a priority.  do ALL of your back and bicep work with a thumbless grip.  also, do a lot of pulls double overhand to really work that grip…also.. use plenty of chalk. 

     
    Sounds exactly like me…. The weight always ends up like 2 inches away from my legs going up.
     
    In the interests of provoking some good discussion, here’s my shitty strapless conventional deadlift. (Interestingly, I need straps to pull with anywhere near max speed on submaximal weights, otherwise I jerk the weight right out of my hands. 315 moves litterally twice as fast with straps as it does strapless. THAT’S how bad my grip is… So thanks for the advice on it, meat and potato (ha). I’ll get on that.)
     

    Reply
  9. MindofShadow

    1. Sumos are gay because they aren’t as cool as conventional… not even close. 
     
    2. What helped me with grip… no straps ever, BB Static holds both mixed and DOH, DB static holds with fat gripz, plate pinches, shrugs with no straps, pull ups holding onto the end of the straps. I trained 4x a week and would do one of them at the end of 3 of the workouts. 
     
    3. Rounding your back is a good way to blow a disc in your back. 

    Reply
  10. Brian

    1. Sumos are gay because they aren’t as cool as conventional… not even close. 
     
    2. What helped me with grip… no straps ever, BB Static holds both mixed and DOH, DB static holds with fat gripz, plate pinches, shrugs with no straps, pull ups holding onto the end of the straps. I trained 4x a week and would do one of them at the end of 3 of the workouts. 
     
    3. Rounding your back is a good way to blow a disc in your back. 

     
     
    Can you lift max without straps? I’m kinda under the impression that grip is a progressive issue and everyone reaches a point where they can lift more than they can grip. I know some claim using straps is cheating, but the it was explained to me, and it makes sense, is at some point your body will be able to lift more than your hands are trained to hold; so long as your body can lift it, grip is just a means to keep it attached to you.

    Reply
  11. MindofShadow

    Most people can hold more than they can deadlift. Some people have issues like small hands but that isn’t the majority. 
     
    I found grip easy to train and fix. You just need to put the effort in and once you fix it it generally isn’t an issue anymore

    Reply
  12. Brian

    Well, I dont really mind if I need to use straps, to me its a non issue. If I can one day get by without them, great, if not, no biggie. It’ll be a while before I start training heavy again, so my grip for reps is fine.

    Reply
  13. maraudermeat

    Well, I dont really mind if I need to use straps, to me its a non issue. If I can one day get by without them, great, if not, no biggie. It’ll be a while before I start training heavy again, so my grip for reps is fine.

    I think many of the things we are talking about go over your head because most people replying to these things are competitive powerlifters. It’s a running joke among powerlifters that sumo is gay much like being a BOF. Im sure you don’t know what that means. Its along the same lines as using straps. We cant use them in competition so for the most part we dont use them. From a recreational lifters view who gives a shit.

    Whoever told you that grip strength will be eclipsed by the amount one can lift doesn’t know their ass from a hole in the ground. In the powerlifting world when someone misses a lift because of a grip issue everyone knows that’s just poor training, not a physical limitation.

    Reply
  14. Brandon

    Where do you guys draw the line for too much rounding? Perfect arched back? Neutral? Slight curvature?
     
    I notice a lot (the huge majority?) of top deadlifts round over some, and there is a definite point of diminishing returns (tough lockout).

    Reply
  15. maraudermeat

    prolly most other days too

    you posted this…..
     
    So, last week my wife and I came to an agreement: I lose at least a 1lb a week (I’m aiming for at least 2 or 3), or I am required to complete some manner of home project for her (I HATE doing home projects – i’m the least handy dude on the planet!!)
     
     
    and this….
     
     
     
     
     
     
    and i’m gay????

    Reply
  16. MindofShadow

    Where do you guys draw the line for too much rounding? Perfect arched back? Neutral? Slight curvature?
     
    I notice a lot (the huge majority?) of top deadlifts round over some, and there is a definite point of diminishing returns (tough lockout).

     
    Neutral is best in my opinion. 
     
    There is going to be some degree of grinding on max attempts especially at meets. But training to round every week year after year is begging for it.

    Reply
  17. Ryan Gosling

    you posted this…..
     
    So, last week my wife and I came to an agreement: I lose at least a 1lb a week (I’m aiming for at least 2 or 3), or I am required to complete some manner of home project for her (I HATE doing home projects – i’m the least handy dude on the planet!!)
     
     
    and this….
     
     
     
     
     
     
    and i’m gay????

     
    Hahahaha. Perfect.

    Reply
  18. maraudermeat

    Neutral is best in my opinion. 
     
    There is going to be some degree of grinding on max attempts especially at meets. But training to round every week year after year is begging for it.

    I hope Brandon means upper back.  I definitely think there’s something to be said for allowing the upper back to round.  I allow my shoulders to roll forward when i setup and pull the slack out of the bar.   But i agree with Mind… lower back rounding is not good.  when i see my guys doing that we immidiately stop them and adjust their form. 

    Reply
  19. Brian

    you posted this…..
     
    So, last week my wife and I came to an agreement: I lose at least a 1lb a week (I’m aiming for at least 2 or 3), or I am required to complete some manner of home project for her (I HATE doing home projects – i’m the least handy dude on the planet!!)
     
     
    and this….
     
     
     
     
     
     
    and i’m gay????

     
     
     
     
    No, your not – your just an asshole and its rather fitting that you mod a site with less than 10 regularly active people.
     
    Wanna make fun of my chub? Cool, I can dig it, but dont kid yourself or posture as if you should be taken seriously or credible when your just another hack shit talker who happens to get a cool little blue moderator title.
     
    It seems the short man syndrome is strong with you….
     
     
     
    So yeah, I need to lose weight – and I am doing just that (247 as of today). And yeah, I am not the most handy guy around the house – but I am learning.
     
    However, you are and always will be vertically challenged, and your are also an asshole -  and only one of those things is in your power to change, but it would first require you to even acknowledge it. Sucks to be you homie.

    Reply
  20. Brian

    Hahahaha. Perfect.

     
     
    Dude, considering the videos youve posted, youd be wise to keep your mouth shut – you belong on awkward gym moments brah – your like a bad joke that never ends

    Reply
  21. Brian

    I think many of the things we are talking about go over your head because most people replying to these things are competitive powerlifters. It’s a running joke among powerlifters that sumo is gay much like being a BOF. Im sure you don’t know what that means. Its along the same lines as using straps. We cant use them in competition so for the most part we dont use them. From a recreational lifters view who gives a shit.

    Whoever told you that grip strength will be eclipsed by the amount one can lift doesn’t know their ass from a hole in the ground. In the powerlifting world when someone misses a lift because of a grip issue everyone knows that’s just poor training, not a physical limitation.

     
     
    Sure, go chat with the folks over at EliteFTS and tell them this…I’m pretty sure they have lost more credibility than you will ever have.
     
     
    I will leave you & your fellow powerlifters to your  circle jerk…err…discussion…..

    Reply
  22. Brian

    Nobody wins a flame war.

     
     
    Its a shame your site allows such jerks to be moderators (referring to meathead)
     
     
    Cant imagine why participation is so low…smh
     
     
    adios!

    Reply
  23. maraudermeat

    No, your not – your just an asshole and its rather fitting that you mod a site with less than 10 regularly active people.
     
    Wanna make fun of my chub? Cool, I can dig it, but dont kid yourself or posture as if you should be taken seriously or credible when your just another hack shit talker who happens to get a cool little blue moderator title.
     
    It seems the short man syndrome is strong with you….
     
     
     
    So yeah, I need to lose weight – and I am doing just that (247 as of today). And yeah, I am not the most handy guy around the house – but I am learning.
     
    However, you are and always will be vertically challenged, and your are also an asshole -  and only one of those things is in your power to change, but it would first require you to even acknowledge it. Sucks to be you homie.

    dude… you made a comment that i thought was funny and i made one back.  don’t take the internet so serious. 

    Reply
  24. Potato

    A question for the vertically challenged hack shit talking little boy blue meatheaded asshole.. Ah shit, I forgot my question writing out your new nick, you gay jerkoff.

    Reply
  25. maraudermeat

    A question for the vertically challenged hack shit talking little boy blue meatheaded asshole.. Ah shit, I forgot my question writing out your new nick, you gay jerkoff.

    words hurt tater.

    Reply
  26. RJorg

    Soooo back on topic, I used to think deadlifting ghey (sumo) every week was a recipe for disaster. But now I no longer think so. In fact, I am doing a deadlift variation twice per week and everything is fine.
     
    Also started pulling conventional whenever I’m having a shit day. It’s kind of fun, actually!

    Reply
  27. maraudermeat

    Soooo back on topic, I used to think deadlifting ghey (sumo) every week was a recipe for disaster. But now I no longer think so. In fact, I am doing a deadlift variation twice per week and everything is fine.
     
    Also started pulling conventional whenever I’m having a shit day. It’s kind of fun, actually!

    i always pulled waaayyy ghey sumo back in the day until i tore my adductor.  i was forced to switch to conventional.  I pull mostly conventional now but still play around with it’s ghey counterpart.  both have their benefits. 
     
    here’ s a question… what cue did you learn from someone that just clicked in your head and made the deadlift feel so much better and the weight lighter??
     
    for me it was spreading the floor on my initial pull. i had always just let my knees move forward on my conventional dead.  then one day i heard the cue to spread the floor and push your legs out against your arms.  i did this and immdiately felt a difference.  it activated my hips and kept my ass from shooting up. 

    Reply
  28. Ryan Gosling

     
    I will leave you & your fellow powerlifters to your  circle jerk…err…discussion…..

     
    Oh god, it’s FINALLY happened!!!
     
    tumblr_mgygeyOFp81qza0wjo1_250.gif
     
    Don’t let the door hit your blubbery ass on the way out, bitch.

    Reply
  29. Ryan Gosling

    i always pulled waaayyy ghey sumo back in the day until i tore my adductor.  i was forced to switch to conventional.  I pull mostly conventional now but still play around with it’s ghey counterpart.  both have their benefits. 
     
    here’ s a question… what cue did you learn from someone that just clicked in your head and made the deadlift feel so much better and the weight lighter??
     
    for me it was spreading the floor on my initial pull. i had always just let my knees move forward on my conventional dead.  then one day i heard the cue to spread the floor and push your legs out against your arms.  i did this and immdiately felt a difference.  it activated my hips and kept my ass from shooting up. 

     
    A few weeks ago Brandon showed me how to use my lats when I pull. I’m still working on it, but it really helps me keep it all in tight. 

    Reply
  30. ryno76

     

    Its a shame your site allows such jerks to be moderators (referring to meathead)
     
     
    Cant imagine why participation is so low…smh
     
     
    adios!

    Wow, that was suprisingly thin-skinned and hardly what I expect from someone who used to serve in the Army. I saw what appeared to be a good natured joke answered with another good natured joke. Not sure where the sudden shit storm came from.
     
    I would guess the participation is “so low” because this site does not attract near as many 16 year old “bro lifters” as some of the other crap forums. Unfortunately, those same “bros” don’t contribute anything worth while and ask constant newb questions.
     
    Personally, I’ll take quality over quantity anyday.
     
    You may have misunderstood Meat’s joke, but I can tell you he was one of the strongest and most helpful dudes at the forum I used to go to. That’s why I followed him over here.

    Reply
  31. ryno76

    here’ s a question… what cue did you learn from someone that just clicked in your head and made the deadlift feel so much better and the weight lighter??
     

    I read to imagine that the bar was stationary and that you are shoving your feet through the floor rather than picking the weight up. That and deadlifting/squatting in Chucks have made a difference for me.

    Reply
  32. maraudermeat

     

     

    Wow, that was suprisingly thin-skinned and hardly what I expect from someone who used to serve in the Army. I saw what appeared to be a good natured joke answered with another good natured joke. Not sure where the sudden shit storm came from.
     
    I would guess the participation is “so low” because this site does not attract near as many 16 year old “bro lifters” as some of the other crap forums. Unfortunately, those same “bros” don’t contribute anything worth while and ask constant newb questions.
     
    Personally, I’ll take quality over quantity anyday.
     
    You may have misunderstood Meat’s joke, but I can tell you he was one of the strongest and most helpful dudes at the forum I used to go to. That’s why I followed him over here.
     

    i really appreciate your words my friend.  Hopefully Brian’s skin will thicken up some.  I was just being funny and i applaud him for attempting to get into shape but I couldn’t let that go. it was just too easy.  
     
    anyway.. I actually hope he doesn’t leave the site.  He can learn a lot from being around here. 

    Reply
  33. maraudermeat

    I read to imagine that the bar was stationary and that you are shoving your feet through the floor rather than picking the weight up. That and deadlifting/squatting in Chucks have made a difference for me.

    yep….. that’s a good one.  also realizing that the deadlift is a pull not a pick up.  you are actually pulling the weight into you not bending over and picking it up. 

    Reply
  34. Brandon

    here’ s a question… what cue did you learn from someone that just clicked in your head and made the deadlift feel so much better and the weight lighter??
     
    for me it was spreading the floor on my initial pull. i had always just let my knees move forward on my conventional dead.  then one day i heard the cue to spread the floor and push your legs out against your arms.  i did this and immdiately felt a difference.  it activated my hips and kept my ass from shooting up. 

     
    For me, ROM stuff like narrowing the legs, and making the arms longer. I used to have one of those wide conventional stances with the knees buckled in at the bottom. All this allowed me to get into a slightly higher starting position to rip the bar off the floor faster.

    Reply
  35. RJorg

    dude you are short too… he was talking about both of us. 

    I was going to claim 5′ 9″ was average, but it turns out average American male height is 5′ 10-1/2″ :(

    Reply
  36. anonymous_burn

    Cue that helped me was drive through your heels, to the point that you should be able to curl your toes up and not have a problem with the lift. I always know if I feel a lot of weight in the balls of my feet that I fucked up the rep. 
     
    I way prefer deficit pulls to rack pulls because I can’t ever set up for a rack pull right, I always end up with a sore lower back. That being said, my sticking point is typically between my knees and my nuts and maybe rack pulls would work to fix that? Or Dimels?
     
    So my piggyback question is Rack Pulls or Dimel Deadlifts?  

    Reply
  37. Clutz15

    Holy melt down Batman!
     
    Short People Unite!
     
    Anywho, does anyone actually do rack pulls anymore??

     
    I’m really not a fan of rack pulls. The bar bounces funny between reps and the bar doesn’t react the same set on the pins rather than the floor. Block pulls on the other hand i really like for enforcing good sumo technique. They don’t have to be used for overload but can allow for more volume in the higher percentages. So long as the blocks are set at a valuable height I think they are a really good tool. Conventional, the approach is certainly a little different and where you set up off the blocks doesn’t mimic the movement aswell. 

    Reply
  38. RJorg

    Changing the height of the bar has never helped my sumo dead (i.e. deficit or block pull). I think the only reason it progressed past 3x was lots of practice, being a stickler about technique, and good assistance choices.
     
    As for cues, “knees out” and “head back” are the two I use. Almost like the bar is being pulled back through the shins.

    Reply
  39. Potato

    Anybody played around with doing higher reps on deadlifts for there main set and had good results? I don’t follow powerlifting much at all, but I’ve noticed george leeman and a few other powerhouse pullers seem to train in a relatively high rep range. Same with strongmen, they all have awesome pulls and I assume they train deadlift in a similar way due to the events.

    Reply
  40. Brandon

    Anybody played around with doing higher reps on deadlifts for there main set and had good results? I don’t follow powerlifting much at all, but I’ve noticed george leeman and a few other powerhouse pullers seem to train in a relatively high rep range. Same with strongmen, they all have awesome pulls and I assume they train deadlift in a similar way due to the events.

     
    I ran a couple cycles of high rep back down sets, but not the main lift. It was sets of 10, and it did improve my deadlift at that time and stage maybe 455-500ish deadlift range.
     
    What I didn’t like about it was how difficult it was to not totally stiff leg, round over, heave the weights up once fatigued on rep 7… 8, 9, 10. Reinforced pretty crappy form over time and I started pulling warm up singles in the same way I’d pull my last rep of a widowmaker. If you can reset each rep, and maintain good form – you might be able to get away with it.

    Reply
  41. Brandon

    I have one… does anyone deadlift beltless primarily? Thoughts on belt usage on deadlifts in training?
     
    I’ve always felt more comfortable pulling beltless, and it seems to give me some good pop off the floor when I go belted come meet day. It’s like strapping rockets onto the bar. I’ve noticed no adjustment time needed or anything… just slap on and go.

    Reply
  42. MindofShadow

    I don’t know about a cue, but I watched one of the Russian’s sumo pull (I think Beleavy spelling?) and something clicked a little bit. Mostly just not dropping my hips so damn low. 
     
    I am too afraid to pull beltless due to all my back injuries. I will squat beltless but not pull. Belt comes on at 225. Too scared lol. 
     
    I don’t considered dimels in the same class as rack pulls. Dimels are supposed to be done higher repped and ballistic style… that are more of an assistance exercise not a supplemental exercise like Rack Pulls in my opinion. 
     
    But I suck at deadlifting so I should probably just stop posting haha. 

    Reply
  43. anonymous_burn

    I pull without a belt until I get to the 90+ percentage range. I pretty much feel how Brandon does, I want to save that pop for the hardest reps. I would like to get one of those velcro Spud belts, just because getting my huge leather one in place for deadlifts is a pain in the ass (I’m short and have to wear it high). 

    Reply
  44. Brandon

    Anyone have any positive experiences with bands, pulling against and with? Or is straight weight best for the most part?
     
    I’ve run a few cycles with bands for singles and triples, sort of WSBB style. They were a lot of fun, but I’m never stuck with them long enough to know if it was helping much.

    Reply
  45. maraudermeat

    Anyone have any positive experiences with bands, pulling against and with? Or is straight weight best for the most part?
     
    I’ve run a few cycles with bands for singles and triples, sort of WSBB style. They were a lot of fun, but I’m never stuck with them long enough to know if it was helping much.

    i like them as a change of pace.  I actually like reverse bands a lot.  i set them up so that they drop off around knee level.  I like feeling the heavy weight in my hands that i otherwise wouldn’t be able to break off the floor. 
     
    i find chains to be superior to bands though.  bands tend to keep you in a certain bar path and i find myself actually cheating by leaning way back when i pull with them. you can’t do that with chains. 

    Reply
  46. JWatkin

    A couple of things:

    1.)5’9″ is not short. My husband id 5’2″ and that’s a good height. More than that is unnecessary

    2.) I use straps to row and a couple of other things but have never felt they were useful to me for pulling. For me, it’s like the entire movement doesn’t properly start until your hands grip the bar. I’ve tried pulling with straps before but it’s like nothing activates without the grip

    3.) I don’t find rack pulls or pulling off boxes useful. I like pulling from boxes because it’s good for my ego but I’ve never seen any carry over to my lock out. For lock out work, I prefer pulling to the knees, pausing and then finishing the lift.

    4.) I often pull without a belt. I’ll go as far as I can before I put a belt on. The first time I pulled 315 it was no belt.

    Reply
  47. DOA

    Cues that helped me
    1. initiate movement from the balls of the feet to use more quads off the floor
    2. make your knees travel forward off the floor
    3. Get shoulders in front of bar at the start pull up then back
    4. ‘Row’ lockout to get your shoulders back
     
    If i could pick one thought, it’s STOP PULLING BACK OFF THE FLOOR

    Reply

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